A Video of our October program: Peregrine Falcon Restoration in Acadia National Park – with Patrick Kark

This program was presented on September 21, 2021. Please click on the link below to watch the program. You can also scroll down to the original post on this program for a full description.

https://us02web.zoom.us/rec/share/HZY-Fr3fcCiriX-CBMatA_je_DclOjZ-j2h04NB8icMFoEXQIZOE6LZD13EnHgHl.GZq6XXS4bp3JYYZ8?startTime=1632265463000

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Peregrine Falcon Restoration in Acadia National Park – with Patrick Kark – Tuesday, September 21st

The Peregrine Falcon is thought to be the fastest animal on earth. Want to learn more?  On Tuesday, September 21st, York County Audubon will present a Zoom program entitled:  Peregrine Falcon Restoration in Acadia National Park with Park Ranger Patrick Kark.

Peregrine Falcon – photo courtesy of Maine IFW

The Peregrine Falcon was one of the first species to be listed under the federal Endangered Species Act, and the species’ recovery is one of the Act’s greatest success stories. Acadia National Park has a storied history in the Peregrine Project.  Join Ranger Patrick Kark as he discusses this success story and tells of the interesting places Acadia’s falcons have impacted far outside the park’s borders. 

Peregrine Falcon chicks back in their scrape after being banded

Acadia also hosts the Cadillac Mountain Hawkwatch which is in its 27th counting season this fall.  Find out how Cadillac fits into the larger network of raptor migration monitoring sites across the continent.  Unlike other watch sites, Cadillac Mountain usually gives viewers unusual perspectives of birds that might include face-to-face photos of raptors that cross the highest mountain on the eastern seaboard. 

Patrick Kark came to Maine in 2014 as Acadia’s raptor intern. He has worked eight seasons at the park as an ornithology park ranger and is currently working as a visual information specialist for the park.

The program will begin at 7 p.m.  There’s no charge to participate, but advance registration is required. To do so, please click on this link and enter your name and email address:

https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_M1dJkSsYSVqLTKweZpvVQA

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting. We hope you can join us!

To show our appreciation for raptors, YCA is making a contribution to The Peregrine Fund.  You can find out more and make a donation if you wish by visiting www.peregrinefund.org

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A Video of our June program: Birds of SE Asia: a focus on Cambodian Natural History

This program was presented on June 15, 2021. Please scroll down to the original post on this program for a full description.

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Birds of SE Asia: a focus on Cambodian Natural History – with Howie Nielsen – Tuesday, June 15th

Ever wondered what birds might be found in Cambodia?  On Tuesday, June 15th, York County Audubon will present a Zoom program entitled: Birds of SE Asia: a focus on Cambodian Natural History with Howie Nielsen.

Doctor Howie Nielsen is a world class birder who lives in Lincoln County, Maine. Getting hooked on birds when he was in graduate school, Howie’s birding adventures have allowed him to be involved in studying flora and fauna while traveling in multiple countries. He’s now a retired dentist who has volunteered his services in six different countries.

For 10 years Howie was in and out of Cambodia, where he was Training Adviser for the Sam Veasna Center for Wildlife Conservation, a local affiliate of Wildlife Conservation Society. During his time in Cambodia he participated in bird surveys, developed a cohort of Cambodian bird guides, guided bird tours, and sampled bird populations for dangerous strains of avian influenza virus.  His program will give an overview of Cambodia ecosystems and their associated bird life. He will share some of his exciting experiences doing field work in the SE Asian bush such as the discovery of a bird previously unknown to science.

York County Audubon will be presenting this program online on Tuesday, June 15th at 7 p.m.  There’s no charge to participate, but you need to register in advance to watch this program. To do so, please click on this link and enter your name and email address:

https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_mBLhXFYTQG2Z2qUXrzjBnQ

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

We hope you can join us!

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Ravens, Wolves and People – with John Marzluff – Tuesday, May 18th

On May 18th, Wildlife professor John Marzluff will bring us an exciting program on recent work in Yellowstone National Park which looked at interactions between ravens, wolves, and people.  Ravens are known to scavenge food from wolves and people but the relationship has not been well studied.

In 2019 Matthias Loretto and presenter John Marzluff began tagging ravens in Yellowstone with radio transmitters that are similar to the transmitter in your mobile device.  After tagging and following many ravens they were able to relate raven’s movements to the activities of people and wolves. From this the scientists gained a better understanding of the degree to which ravens rely on people and wolves.  Ravens have extensive knowledge of the greater Yellowstone ecosystem.  You will be surprised at the diverse ways they take advantage of human activities within this 6500 square mile area.

For decades, John has done research on corvids- a family of birds that includes ravens, crows, jays, and magpies. His work has benefited birds all over the world, from pinyon jays in Arizona, ravens in Greenland and golden eagles and prairie falcons in Idaho to Washington State’s goshawks and the endangered Hawaiian hawk, one of the rarest birds in the world.

John Marzloff PhD is a professor in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences at the University of Washington. He is the author of several books including, In the Company of Crows and Ravens; Gifts of the Crow: How Perception, Emotion, and Thought Allow Smart Birds to Behave Like Humans; and Welcome to Subirdia: Sharing Our Neighborhoods with Wrens, Robins, Woodpeckers, and Other Wildlife.

York County Audubon will be presenting this program online on Tuesday, May 18th at 7 p.m.  There’s no charge to participate, but you need to register in advance to watch this program. To do so, please click on this link and enter your name and email address:

https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_vSf9GtzyRKeP6iijpd_qvg

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

We hope you can join us!

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The Harlequin – Spring 2021

Please click on the link below to view the Autumn 2020 issue of our Harlequin newsletter

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A Video of our April Program: Decades of Change in Maine’s Birds

This program was presented on April 20, 2021. Scroll down to the original post on this program for a full description. Note that the recording starts after the introduction, but includes the full program.

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Decades of Change in Maine’s Birds – with Doug Hitchcox – Tuesday, April 20th

If you’ve lived in Maine for a while, you’ve probably noticed that bird populations have changed and continue to do so.  Just a few decades ago, birds such as the Northern Cardinal, the Tufted Titmouse, the Red-Bellied Woodpecker and the Carolina Wren were uncommon sightings here, if seen at all.  Birds such as the Eastern Bluebird were much fewer in number.  In 1949, Robert Palmer’s then definitive Maine Birds described the “Eastern” Cardinal as “a very rare visitant,” with most sightings being “escaped captives.” As for the Tufted Titmouse, he noted there was one specimen in the University of Maine collection from 1890, but no records since.

Bird Atlases are an essential tool for cataloging birds, and have been created for every U.S. state. From 1978-1983, birders created Maine’s first Breeding Bird Atlas, but it is now significantly out of date. Intensive work to create an updated second one is underway. 2021 marks the fourth year (of five) for this second Maine Bird Atlas, a project by the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife to document the breeding and winter ranges of Maine’s birds.

Northern Parula building a nest – Doug Hitchcox photo

On Tuesday, April 20th at 7 p.m., York County Audubon is pleased to present a zoom program entitled “Decades of Change in Maine’s Birds.”  Presenter Doug Hitchcox is the Outreach Coordinator for the Maine Bird Atlas and Staff Naturalist for Maine Audubon.  He will share an update on the project, focusing on what the goals are for the last two years and especially how you can help! Data collected as part of this project will be invaluable in guiding future species status assessments, priority species’ needs, and identifying and conserving high value wildlife habitats. In order for it to be successful, we need the help of community scientists, like yourselves, to help fill in the gaps before this survey is over.

York County Audubon will be presenting this program online. There’s no charge to participate, but you need to register in advance to watch this program. To do so, please click on this link and enter your name and email address:

https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_XGQxm2LyQkOX9PfYsGvkmw

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

We hope you can join us!

Posted in Zoom | Tagged ,

A Video of our March program on the Birds-of-Paradise Project

This program was presented on March 16th, 2021. Scroll down to the original post on this program for a full description. Note that the recording starts with a few minutes of birding small talk to give viewers a chance to join us.

Posted in Uncategorized, video

The Birds-of-Paradise Project: Natural history media for science and conservation – with Edwin Scholes – Tuesday, March 16th

Red Bird of Paradise – photo by Tim Laman

Among the most amazing creatures in the world, more than 40 species of birds-of-paradise live in New Guinea’s swaths of the Indo-Pacific rainforest region, one of the largest intact tropical forested areas on Earth.

The stars of the show in National Geographic and PBS Nature TV documentaries, the birds-of-paradise have become icons of New Guinea’s rainforests. Their extraordinary beauty is unlike that of any other birds on Earth, but it’s their wide range of bizarre breeding behaviors that captivates audiences—from elaborate dancing and flaring their elegant plumes to shape-shifting displays that make these exotic species seem like avian transformers.

Edwin Scholes is the founder and leader of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Birds-of-Paradise Project, and has been studying and documenting them since his first trip to New Guinea in 1999. It was in 1997 as an undergraduate biology student that Ed first saw the BBC documentary film “Attenborough in Paradise.” That film, which was the result of Sir David Attenborough’s lifelong passion for the birds-of-paradise, was the first to capture these birds’ wonder and beauty in any depth.  The film inspired Edwin to devote his career to their study and protection.

On Tuesday, March 16th, at 7 p.m., York County Audubon will be delighted to host Ed Scholes to tell us about these amazing creatures, and the efforts to preserve their threatened habitat.   FMI:  www.birdsofparadiseproject.org

York County Audubon will be presenting this program online. There’s no charge to participate, but you need to register in advance to watch this program. To do so, please click on this link and enter your name and email address:

https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Jtyi8u8uRRy5aESZyx_4ZA

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

We hope you can join us!

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