A Video of Zack Klyver’s Program: The Narwhal’s Tusk – The Ten Most Remarkable Marine Mammal Adaptations

This program was presented on Nov 17th. Scroll down to the original post on this program for a full description.

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The 2021 Maine Birds Desk Calendar is now available!

For many years, our former Board member, Marie Jordan, an avid birder and photographer, has produced a calendar and offered it for sale, with her graciously donating the calendars to YCA to support our educational programs. We’ve always presented them at our fall program meetings, but this year that’s not possible, of course, so we’re making them available by mail. 

It’s a desk calendar in a 4” by 6” plastic case that opens into a stand to display each month.  Each page features a great photo she took this year of a Maine bird.  The cost is $10 plus mailing costs.  They’re wonderful anywhere in the house, and also make great gifts!   And York County Audubon tremendously appreciates your support for our programs. 

To place an order, please make out a check payable to York County Audubon, write Calendar in the memo line, and mail it to Marie Jordan, 32 Crestview Drive, South Portland, ME 04106.  Be sure to include the address or addresses that the calendar(s) should be sent to.   If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Marie at wooddk5555@gmail.com.

The costs including postage and handling are:

1 calendar – $10 plus $4 postage and handling

2 calendars (mailed to one address) – $20 plus $6 postage and handling

3 calendars (mailed to one address) – $30 plus $8.50 postage and handling

4 calendars (mailed to one address) – $35 plus 8.50 postage and handling

Thank you!

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The Narwhal’s Tusk: the ten most remarkable marine mammal adaptations – with Zack Klyver – November 17th

Have you ever wondered why a narwhal has a tusk? How sperm whales catch squid in the deep dark ocean? Which whale has the biggest tail, lives the longest, and holds the world migration record? Did you know that whale “waste” results in great plant plankton blooms in the ocean that produce the oxygen we breath, slow climate change and help create more productive fisheries?

On Tuesday, November 17th, York County Audubon is delighted to host an online Zoom program featuring Maine marine mammal naturalist and conservationist Zack Klyver.  He will give a presentation based on a book he is writing titled The Narwhal’s Tusk: the ten most remarkable marine mammal adaptations. Over millions of years of evolution, marine mammal physiology has evolved to take full advantage of the world’s oceans. Marine mammals occupy all oceans and major rivers of the world.

Narwhals (c) Paul Nicklin and Getty Images

Sound and hearing are incredibly important to marine mammals as sound travels through ocean water four to five times more quickly than air. We will explore the magnificent sound production system called  echolocation in Sperm Whales – the largest of the toothed whales and the icon of Moby Dick.

Zack will draw on his personal travels from around the world, including the Arctic and Antarctica, and his encounter with the oldest known living blue whale in the world. Learn all about the narwhal’s tusk, how deep marine mammals dive, how long they live, and other examples of astounding adaptations. Recent scientific discoveries have also expanded our knowledge around the important role marine mammals play in oxygen production, carbon sequestration, and the regulation of global climate.

Zack was born in Nairobi, Kenya in 1968 and grew up in a commercial fishing family in Eastport, Maine, the eastern most city in the United States. He is a graduate of College of the Atlantic in Bar Harbor, Maine, and has worked for thirty years as a whale watch naturalist guiding whale and seabird watching tours on the Gulf of Maine and around the world. During that time, he led over 3,000 trips with 600,000 people.

On Tuesday, November 17th at 7 p.m., we’re delighted to have Zack present this program. There’s no charge to participate, but you need to register in advance to watch this program. To do so, please click on this link and enter your name and email address:

https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_R-C17_1FSYKfW_Wi2PkLaQ

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

We hope you can join us!

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A Video of Greg LeClair’s program: Conserving Reptiles and Amphibians – a Maine Focus

This program was presented on Oct 20th. Scroll down to the original post on this program for a full description.

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The Harlequin – Autumn 2020

Please click on the link below to view the Autumn 2020 issue of our Harlequin newsletter, including a feature article: John James Audubon – Revisited.

http://www.yorkcountyaudubon.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Harlequin-Autumn-2020.pdf

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Our 2020 Bird Seed Sale is Coming!

Keep your feathered friends happy this winter by treating them to tasty and fresh, premium quality bird food and help support two of your favorite environmental organizations at the same time.  Profits from our annual sale support the educational programs of both York County Audubon and the Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve.  A wide variety of types of seed and suet is available, with great pricing, especially if you order early.

Early bird pricing is available if you place your order by 4 p.m. on Friday, October 30th.  The instructions for ordering are on the order form which you can access via the link in red below.

Order pick up (and additional opportunity for purchases) will be at the Wells Reserve on Friday, November 13th from 1 – 4 p.m., and Saturday, Nov 14th from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., with easy access and volunteers on hand to help load your car. 

For more information, please access the order form via this link:SeedSale2020Download

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Conserving Reptiles and Amphibians – A Maine Focus with Greg LeClair – Oct 20th

Gregory LeClair is a wildlife biologist with a contagious passion for amphibians and reptiles that he has honed from early in his life. In our October Zoom program, he will share his enthusiasm, concerns, and insight into diverse topics including amphibian extinction, the exotic pet trade, habitat destruction, the impact of human attitudes on wildlife conservation, and more. He’ll offer backyard landscaping recommendations, and offer other ways we can become involved in protecting these threatened species. Adults will love this fascinating program. It would also be appropriate for middle school or high school students who are curious about working with wildlife.

Greg LeClair is a master’s student at the University of Maine where he studies environmental DNA (eDNA) applications in turtle conservation. He graduated from Unity College in 2018 with a BS in Wildlife Biology, where he participated in herpetological research projects on snakes, salamanders, frogs, and turtles with Dr. Matthew Chatfield. Greg is the project creator of The Big Night: Maine Amphibian Migration Monitoring and hosts a YouTube show about wildlife conservation, GregmentsBio which features videos that detail the science behind these issues. His research projects focus on applied threatened species conservation with a strong taste for reptiles and amphibians.

On Tuesday, October 20th at 7 p.m., we’re delighted to have Greg present this program. There’s no charge to participate, but you need to register in advance to watch this program. To do so, please click on this link and enter your name and email address:

https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_K_JjaindRiue2KNQoFQxXA

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

We hope you can join us!

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A video of Dr. Don Lyon’s program: Seabird Sentinels in the Gulf of Maine

This program was presented on Sept 15th. Scroll down for a full description.

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Seabird sentinels in the Gulf of Maine: What they can tell us about the state of our oceans – with Dr. Don Lyons – Sept 15th

By the middle of the 20th century, the populations of many species of seabirds in the Gulf of Maine had been decimated.  Puffins had last nested on Eastern Egg Rock in 1885 and terns in 1936.  In 1973, National Audubon started a program to reintroduce and establish the Maine breeding grounds for these species, led by seabird visionary Steve Kress.  In 2019, forty-five years later, Steve retired and turned over the program to new leadership.

The program has proved exceptionally successful. The population of Atlantic Puffins has grown to more than 1,000 nesting pairs on five coastal Maine islands, and nesting colonies have been restored for over 40,000 other seabirds.  Furthermore, the restoration techniques developed in Maine have now been used to bring back more than 50 species of seabirds around the world, many critically endangered. But the work is far from done, as these populations continue to face dramatic new challenges.

Common Tern – photo by Jean Hall

On Tuesday, September 15th, at 7 p.m., we’re delighted to welcome Dr. Donald Lyons, who now leads Audubon’s seabird programs in Maine.  He’ll share the latest information on the health of our seabird populations, and the outlook going forward. We can now study puffins, terns, and other species to better understand the Gulf of Maine, the looming effects of climate change, and how to manage fisheries for ecosystem health and sustainable economies.

Dr. Donald Lyons

Atlantic Puffin – photo by Derrick Jackson

Dr. Lyons is a Director of Conservation Science for the National Audubon Society, and has spent his career in work directly aligned with Audubon’s Seabird Restoration Program, including the last 20 years at Oregon State University.

There’s no charge to participate, but you need to register in advance to watch this program. To do so, please click on this link and enter your name and email address:

https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_pnBG6K83SKiQABEvKfIcIg

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

We hope you can join us!

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A Video of Josh Fecteau’s program: 23 Reasons to Go Outside

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